Son of Hamas, a review

Son of Hamas is a true story about Mosab Hassan Yousef, the son of one of the founders of Hamas. In his tale, Mosab tells what it was like growing up in Israel as a Palestinian and how he began to view the conflict between Israel and Palestine differently. He had hated the Israelites for the majority of his childhood but some chance happenings in his life altered how viewed the violence and ideologies behind Hamas, PLO, Israel etc. In fact, Mosab became an undercover agent and details many of his missions.

I really liked this book. It was not well written, but the fact that the events were true and many of the accounts were dangerous made up for the lack of writing skills. Had this been a fiction book, I probably would not have finished it. Please note the author is writing from his own point of view, but I think he does give some great insight into the conflict and even more an appropriate response for Christians to consider. I had read a book by Ted Dekker, Tea with Hezbollah, which deals with the same things from a different approach, so if you like Son of Hamas then I recommend Tea with Hezbollah as well and vice versa. Both of these books, I think, give a truer Christian response than the current climate gives. 4 out of 5 stars.

See my review of Tea with Hezbollah, click here.

I was provided this book by Tyndale House Publishers in exchange for a review.

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The Jesus You Can’t Ignore, a review

John MacArthur decided modern Christianity has become too nice and has lost the passion and zeal that Jesus had. MacArthur spends the book explaining how Jesus was confrontational with the Pharisees and Scribes. He uses a harmonization of the gospels to show how Jesus made the first move in this confrontation. Ultimately, MacArthur preposes that we, as Christians, cannot sugar coat the truth.

I agree with MacArthur’s overarching idea but found he included too much speculation and failed to make solid connections between the then and now. MacArthur in the prologue decries how some Christians, including most evangelicals, are too nice to Islam with interfaith dialogues. However, the rest of the book describes Jesus only interacting with fellow Jewish leaders and not interacting with the Roman religion. MacArthur, also, fails to discuss the historical culture compared to the culture today and if this could explain some of Jesus’ actions being so confrontational. I know not much later Paul preached/debated out in the open on his travels as it was cultural to do so. I think he had historical schizophrenia while writing this book, he had some great research in this book but failed to apply it across the whole book. So while MacArthur is right, we should proclaim the truth and not accept heresy to enter the church, we should still be cordial with other faiths which he fails to mention or distinguish.

So I agree, we cannot ignore this aspect of Jesus, but we can and probably should ignore this book.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com <http://BookSneeze.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Tea with Hezbollah, a review

Tea with Hezbollah by Dekker and Medearis is a bold book. They plan to travel to the Middle East and speak with many people Americans would call terrorists, or at least the bad guys and sit down with them and ask them simple, nonpolitical questions. The key question being, Jesus taught to love your enemies how do you understand this? Now you may ask aren’t most of these people Muslim that they will be speaking with, yes, but Muslims believe Jesus, Isa, was a prophet and follow his teachings just as they do Moses, Abraham, and Muhammed.

This best part about these questions are that Dekker and Medearis do not try to interpret the answers but give the transcript of the interview. They leave the interpretation up to the reader. Dekker does provide a narrative of their travels and what leads up to each of their interviews. Also included is the story of a girl named Nicole which is quite intriguing.

I have to say this book definitely help changed my mind about the people who live in the Middle East and I was already quite sympathetic to all sides. Although I think some of the interviewees answered quite carefully and tried to make political statements, I found the answers great and liked Dekker asked many of them what makes them laugh and when was the last time they cried.

The book did a great job of showing these people we so quickly try to dehumanize through calling them terrorists are indeed quite human and not much different than us. I highly recommend this reading not only for Christians but for all Americans as I think we as a whole tend to dehumanize many people from the area.

I wrote this review of my own undertaking and was not provided this book for review.