10 Years Later: The Lesson Not Learned

Ten Years ago today an event happened that altered how America views the world. While there has been positives gained from the experience, there are a key lesson I think America has failed at.

You may ask why would you write this now, on this day. Well, there are tons of stories stating what we have learned that have come out this past week and today, what good does those stories do if they do not also include what ‘we’ still could improve upon?

A terror attack’s main goal is to induce terror. I would say since 11 September 2001Americnas have been more terrified of the world ‘we’ live in. ‘We’ have given into the idea behind the attacks, ‘we’ have vilified a third of the world, a view ‘them’ as ‘them’ and to a greater extent dehumanized ‘them.’

‘We’ have not learned from Gandhi and MLK. ‘We’ have retaliated creating more pain and suffering. A reason given for this was the celebrations in the streets in Middle Eastern countries after the news of the attacks spread. This justified ‘our’ need to respond, see ‘they’ all believe in death to America. ‘They’ all hate us, the celebrations proves it. May I remind ‘us’ that ‘we’ did the exact same thing a few months ago. Osama bin Laden had been murdered and spontaneous celebration broke out across America, chants of USA and people went out into the streets to celebrate. How does this differ? While I think there is a difference, it does not convey a significant difference in attitudes between the two actions. ‘They’ celebrated the falling of a symbol and ‘we’ did so in return. What kind of message does this send? ‘They’ got ‘us’ so ‘we’ get ‘them’ back. For a nation that many wish to call a ‘Christian’ nation, how ‘Christian’ is that response. Last time I checked Jesus said love you enemies and pray for those who persecute you, not retaliate and dehumanize them.

The attacks were an opportunity for ‘us’ to work on reconciliation, to understand a culture different from ‘our’ own. Instead ‘we’ highlighted the differences, working hard to distance ‘ourselves’ from ‘them.’ The gospel is about creating life out of chaos, calling out the foreigner to join the banquet feast. America has chosen another path. ‘We’ responded to terror with terror, ‘we’ furthered the issues that differentiated ‘us’ and ‘them.’

My hope is in the next ten years, this will be the path ‘we’ take, one of reconciliation not hate, peace not war, forgiveness not retaliation. That ‘we’ venture to learn from ‘them,’ to understand ‘them’ on ‘their’ own terms from ‘their’ perspective. The goal would be that there is no longer a ‘us’ and ‘them’ but a collective humanity. ‘Us,’ ‘them,’ we all were created in the image of God, maybe we could treat all people with that respect.

May we forgive, there is no need to forget, we can remember, remember that that was the day we recognized all as human, every single person no matter the color of their skin, the religion proclaimed, the place of residence, etc, a day we united to say you and I are human. A day to learn to live in a global world with our fellow humans. To create out the chaos a new creation, one in which we recognize each other as human.

This has begun in the ‘Arab Spring.’ ‘They’ have learned, violence and terror are not needed to effect change. Nonviolent resistance can be just as effective, if not more so. May ‘we’ remember those lessons, from Gandhi, MLK, and North Africa.

To forgive and forget is to not learn. May ‘we’ forgive and learn, learn to love ‘our’ ‘enemies.’

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Son of Hamas, a review

Son of Hamas is a true story about Mosab Hassan Yousef, the son of one of the founders of Hamas. In his tale, Mosab tells what it was like growing up in Israel as a Palestinian and how he began to view the conflict between Israel and Palestine differently. He had hated the Israelites for the majority of his childhood but some chance happenings in his life altered how viewed the violence and ideologies behind Hamas, PLO, Israel etc. In fact, Mosab became an undercover agent and details many of his missions.

I really liked this book. It was not well written, but the fact that the events were true and many of the accounts were dangerous made up for the lack of writing skills. Had this been a fiction book, I probably would not have finished it. Please note the author is writing from his own point of view, but I think he does give some great insight into the conflict and even more an appropriate response for Christians to consider. I had read a book by Ted Dekker, Tea with Hezbollah, which deals with the same things from a different approach, so if you like Son of Hamas then I recommend Tea with Hezbollah as well and vice versa. Both of these books, I think, give a truer Christian response than the current climate gives. 4 out of 5 stars.

See my review of Tea with Hezbollah, click here.

I was provided this book by Tyndale House Publishers in exchange for a review.

How We Should Have Viewed 9/11

An Islamic community center has been proposed near, again I say, near, the site of the former Twin Towers in NY, “Ground Zero.” This of course brought controversy and the way this controversy has developed is quite frightening to me. I bring this up being the ninth anniversary of 11 September 2001.

I first think there has been an overblown reaction to what happened on 9/11. Instead of Americans waking up to realize that the world is and always has been a violent place and we could be the model for beginning the reversal of this trend. However, as a “Christian” nation (something I vehemently disagree with calling America) we do the un-Christ like reaction of bombing and invading. I remember Christ promoting peace and love, right? Maybe we should go back and read what He taught, I think that would wake us all up, as we all need grace and continually.

As Americans we have allowed this one single act, 9/11, to be our complete and full understanding of the Islamic religion. Do I believe I know the ins and outs of their religion, no, but do I have a knowledge of all the nuances of the Bible, no, do you? If we allow this one event to be are full understanding of Islam then it is perfectly fine for them to point to the Spanish Inquisition or Crusades to be the full and complete understanding of Christianity. Or, would you want someone to define you by one act in your own life, especially an act you are not even proud of? Yet this is what we are doing with 9/11.

If we truly believe in religious freedom and a just society we will welcome the Islamic community center near the “Ground Zero” (GZ) site. This center will, if it functions as proposed, be a place for young Islamic men and women to come and learn about their faith and how to live their lives in America, not as terrorists but as citizens.

A complaint I have heard about this center being so close to GZ: ‘They are building this center on hallow ground.’ If the area is hallowed ground, then America worships strip joints and bars which are much closer to GZ than this center will be. (Though I would argue many do unknowably worship these type places.) Another complaint I have heard is that Islam is a religion that believes in converting everyone to Islam. Okay, this is news how, Christianity also promotes conversion. Anyone remember the Great Commission: Go make disciples in all the nation… How is that any different, oh, right this is Islam we are speaking about so it has to be completely different and terrible.

I can understand an American having these mind frames (we cannot allow this center to be built) but Christians that happen to live in America also having this mind frame is pathetic. I agree, I do not think Islam leads to a true understanding of God, but to show hatred the way many Christians that live in America have is un-Christ like. As Christians we are called to be a better kingdom, the Kingdom of God (no, this is not America, sorry). We are to be peacemakers and live lives that promote and speak of this Kingdom. Will we always be the best examples, no, we are a fallen people saved through faith, but we can be a lot better than we have been here in America. If we want America to be a nation full of Christians (not a Christian nation, Christ did not come and die for land, He did so for people) then we need to start acting like Him. When did He ever go into a Roman temple and condemn it, never, when did He criticize where they where building Roman shrines/temples, never. He did inform the Jewish leaders of how they were misunderstanding what God has called for them. He did go to the people, Jewish and Gentile alike, to show them what the Kingdom of God is and can be. This is what we need to do as Christians. We can go to them and tell them we disagree with their view of God, if we are persecuted for this, so be it, Christ promised us persecution. Maybe the fact we are not being persecuted is a telling sign of how far we have gotten away for Christ? (That statement includes myself.)

The world is full of people with differing ideas, opposing ideologies, and with people (of all races, religions, gender, ages, etc.) prone to violence. Should we in turn respond with hate and violence to those we disagree with, not according to Christ. We should turn the other cheek; we should love them; where they are, not where we want them to be. Love them unconditionally.

As Christians (Americans who are not Christians are allowed to think differently if they wish) we should not oppose the center and should work on changing how we respond to those who may hate, disagree, or oppose us. We are to love them no matter. We were informed to Love God and love our neighbor, and everyone is our neighbor.

I ask that this 9/11 be the beginning of us, Christians, on fully committing to loving others, no matter their, race, gender, religion, economic status, age, and any other label you can think of. But, not to love them as we understand love on earth, but as God loves us, unconditionally. Will we get this right all the time, no, but I think we can improve from where we are, not matter our past accomplishments or failures.

Trying to Restore Honor in Glenn Beck

(Subtitle: but failing)?

Glenn Beck decided to throw a big rally at the Mall in Washington D.C., his rally coincided with the 47th anniversary of MLK Jr’s “I Have a Dream” speech. (Personal aside: Honestly if you thought it was okay for him to do this then I cannot see how you can also claim the mosque in Manhattan is wrong. I think both are/were insensitive but legal nonetheless.) Beck said this rally was not political in nature (though he originally planned it to be). Here is my take on this rally:

Glenn Beck can put on a great show/rally. But he cannot keep a consist message, are we advancing or are returning to the founding fathers, he promoted both. Beck paraded many different people up on the “stage” all of them were spouting unity. However his unity is not a real unity for America as a whole since he had those professing Christ up on the stage. Hey Beck what about the Hindu or Muslim or Atheist or other Americans how are they united in this restoration (he did make one or two small remarks but for the most part it was obviously missing). Oh yeah, isn’t Beck a member of LDS (better known as Mormon). I believe this rally was put on so Beck could point back to this event and say, “See I am a Christian and I call for unity, not divisiveness.” However Beck also calls for us to put or faith, hope, and charity in America and not in God. I seem to recall Jesus preaching the Kingdom of God (Heaven in Matthew) and Jesus made it clear this was not an earthly kingdom such as an America. This is why it is not a good idea to get spiritual/religious guidance from and uneducated man (Beck did not finish a college course or receive any Biblical training). Yet Beck continues to try to teach us what it means to be an American (despite not taking a college level History class) and how to be a Christian (despite being a LDS member and not having any training in the matter). It scares me more that people look to him for advice on these matters. I implore you to reconsider taking Beck at his word and do some research yourself, if you follow him.

While Beck and those who spoke did not make any implicit political statements, many were there in the under tones, especially Palin’s speech. It is obvious from how Beck spoke and how ideas were presented, there was a deep under tone of political ideas and thoughts, the current (and I would say they meant Democrat) politicians are not honorable. Of course none of this was actually said but I think everyone knows this was implied. One only needs to read the comments of those who attended, they got political messages out the rally.

So Glenn Beck tried to restore honor in America, good try Beck, but we need to restore honor in our faith in Christ and live it out as Christ preached. Christ preached the Kingdom of God and not the Kingdom of Israel, Rome, or America. I am sure most of the people Beck had at the rally meant well, but I think Christians in America have gotten off track on what it means to be a Christ follower. Jesus did not come to America (unless you are LDS, as is Beck) and has made no promises to America as a country. Christianity is not own or controlled by Americans, it is a worldwide belief and faith (not a religion though that is how it is practiced). Also it is impossible for America to be a Christian nation, as nations cannot be Christian only people can be.

Martin Luther

Martin Luther is seventh on the list.Martin Luther is the most devious on the list in my opinion. While he was a great theologian, I question his Christian spirit from my reading of him. Name calling really. I realize you had a differing view on some elements of theology from the Catholic but it could have been done more maturely. See Erasmus for a potentially better way to handle the situation, aka reform from within not splinter. I also picked Erasmus but thought he is not quite known enough and too close to Luther.

Chasing Francis, a review

Chasing Francis by Ian Morgan Cron is a fictional account of a pastor taking a pilgrimage to discover the true life, life of Saint Francis of Assisi. Chase Falson is the main character, who at the beginning of this story has a melt down one Sunday morning at his church he founded some years back. The church is unsure how to progress so Chase takes some time off and visits his uncle in Italy who happens to be a Franciscan priest. It is during this trip that Chase discovers Francis and decides how he will progress but will the church take him back?

This story was quite simple, though there are some twists. Despite the twists the story overall, is lacking. However, the discovery of Saint Francis is quite detailed and well told. I enjoyed learning the history of Francis and the parts of his theology/philosophy. The story unfortunately had huge jumps, and the timeline was hard to follow. As a fan of history I enjoyed the historical portions but thought the fictional story could have been much more developed. I do like how it ended though. I would recommend this book to history and theology lovers but not to fiction lovers. If Ian Morgan Cron writes another book of this nature I would try it, hoping he develops the fictional parts a little more.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from NavPress Publishers as part of their Blogger Review Program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commision’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

The Jesus You Can’t Ignore, a review

John MacArthur decided modern Christianity has become too nice and has lost the passion and zeal that Jesus had. MacArthur spends the book explaining how Jesus was confrontational with the Pharisees and Scribes. He uses a harmonization of the gospels to show how Jesus made the first move in this confrontation. Ultimately, MacArthur preposes that we, as Christians, cannot sugar coat the truth.

I agree with MacArthur’s overarching idea but found he included too much speculation and failed to make solid connections between the then and now. MacArthur in the prologue decries how some Christians, including most evangelicals, are too nice to Islam with interfaith dialogues. However, the rest of the book describes Jesus only interacting with fellow Jewish leaders and not interacting with the Roman religion. MacArthur, also, fails to discuss the historical culture compared to the culture today and if this could explain some of Jesus’ actions being so confrontational. I know not much later Paul preached/debated out in the open on his travels as it was cultural to do so. I think he had historical schizophrenia while writing this book, he had some great research in this book but failed to apply it across the whole book. So while MacArthur is right, we should proclaim the truth and not accept heresy to enter the church, we should still be cordial with other faiths which he fails to mention or distinguish.

So I agree, we cannot ignore this aspect of Jesus, but we can and probably should ignore this book.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com <http://BookSneeze.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Tea with Hezbollah, a review

Tea with Hezbollah by Dekker and Medearis is a bold book. They plan to travel to the Middle East and speak with many people Americans would call terrorists, or at least the bad guys and sit down with them and ask them simple, nonpolitical questions. The key question being, Jesus taught to love your enemies how do you understand this? Now you may ask aren’t most of these people Muslim that they will be speaking with, yes, but Muslims believe Jesus, Isa, was a prophet and follow his teachings just as they do Moses, Abraham, and Muhammed.

This best part about these questions are that Dekker and Medearis do not try to interpret the answers but give the transcript of the interview. They leave the interpretation up to the reader. Dekker does provide a narrative of their travels and what leads up to each of their interviews. Also included is the story of a girl named Nicole which is quite intriguing.

I have to say this book definitely help changed my mind about the people who live in the Middle East and I was already quite sympathetic to all sides. Although I think some of the interviewees answered quite carefully and tried to make political statements, I found the answers great and liked Dekker asked many of them what makes them laugh and when was the last time they cried.

The book did a great job of showing these people we so quickly try to dehumanize through calling them terrorists are indeed quite human and not much different than us. I highly recommend this reading not only for Christians but for all Americans as I think we as a whole tend to dehumanize many people from the area.

I wrote this review of my own undertaking and was not provided this book for review.